Enterprise web programming

Units ENTWA (Level 6) and APSW (Level 7)

Kenai and Java.Net

Project Kenai is a connected developer destination where developers can host open source projects, as well as connect, communicate, and collaborate with developers of like mind.

Java.net is a large community of Java developers and their projects.

Kenai is no longer open to new projects; these must be started in Java.Net. Java.Net runs the project management system developed by Project Kenai.

They both provide a range of developer collaboration tools (including Subversion and JIRA, see below). They are highly integrated into NetBeans.

Registering with Kenai

To access existing Kenai projects, you will need to register with Kenai. Please register using your myport.ac.uk or port.ac.uk email address. You do NOT need to be a member of the Sun Developer Network to do so.

Once registered, to get access to Jim's projects, you will need to email him with your (i) Kenai user name; (ii) your email address. He will then add you to his projects with appropriate access rights.

Kenai is no longer allowing the creation of new projects. Use java.net instead.

Registering with Java.Net

To access existing Java.Net projects, or to create a project of your own, you will need to register with java.net. Please register using your myport.ac.uk or port.ac.uk email address.

Once registered, to get access to Jim's projects, you will need to email him with your (i) java.net user name; (ii) your email address. He will then add you to his projects with appropriate access rights.

For your own work, please create your own project. If the project is for a project or coursework, you need to add jimbriggs as a member of your project, in the Software Developer role (so he can help fix your bugs!).

Subversion

Subversion is an open source version control system (one of a number supported by Kenai/Java.Net).

A Subversion repository conventionally is structured in 3 parts:

  1. trunk/ holds the current up-to-date version of each project
  2. tags/ holds copies of the current projects at specific points (e.g. a new release)
  3. branches/ holds working copies of off-shoot projects (e.g. B's private version of A's project)

For the purposes of project or coursework, you should really only need to use the trunk (and perhaps a tag for the alpha and beta release versions).

JIRA

JIRA is a commercial issue tracking system (one of two supported by Kenai/Java.Net).

Using version control and issue tracking together

  1. Every time you want to add a new feature or fix a bug, open a new issue. Note the issue number.
  2. Checkout/update your copy of the project from the version control repository.
  3. Make the necessary changes to the code. This may involve making changes to one or more files - it does not matter.
  4. If you really want to be able to track every change completely, include a comment in the code next to each change. The comment should explain what you've done and, most importantly, include the issue number. This is not essential (since what changed should be determinable from the version control system once committed).
  5. When you have tested that the new feature works or that the bug has been fixed, commit your changes to the version control repository. In the comment box on the commit, explain what you've done and, most importantly, include the issue number.
  6. Go back to the issue tracking system and close the issue.
  7. Repeat ad infinitum.
 

Last updated by Prof Jim Briggs of the School of Computing at the University of Portsmouth

 
The enterprise web programming units include some material that was formerly part of the WEB1P and WEB2P units.